Common Misconceptions About Rosé

and why they are wrong.


 

Let’s start with the most common misconception about rosé of all..

Rosé is a summer only/seasonal drink

    • It’s one of the hallmarks of summer, serving as the perfect transition wine away from winter reds and into the lighter whites that pair so perfectly with warm summer nights.
    • The French even have an expression for it – “rosé tout l’année” or in English, “rosé all year.” In France rosé sales outstrip those of white wines, making it a dominant staple in the country’s culture and cuisine.
    • While there’s nothing more refreshing then a glass of rosé on a hot summer day, there’s a reason taglines and hashtags like “rosé all day” and “yes way rosé” are trending. Rosé is enjoyed year-round!
    • 75% of consumers believe rose is year-around but the trade often refers to it as a summer beverage. Rosé wines between $10-$20 are doubling their already impressive growth from last year.
    • Rosé leading all wine categories at +59% growth – Nielson 2017
    • French Rosé dominates category – Nielson 2017
      • 51% French
      • 37% Domestic
      • 5% Italian

Rosé is feminine or for women only

    • Ever heard of brosé? Men are enjoying rosé just as much as the ladies! Just because it’s pink, doesn’t make it any less manly to enjoy.
      • The pink hue of rosé comes from the grapes and the length of contact between the juice and the skin of red grapes during the winemaking process. The longer the grapes’ skin is left sitting in the wine, the darker the color on the finished rosé.

Rosé is sweet

    • Rosé is versatile. Some are fruit-forward, some are floral, while others may be dry or tart; just like our Très Chic Rosé.
      • Many people think of the mass produced and super sweet white zinfandel. Sugar prevents the wine from shining. When there’s too much sugar, it masks the aromas and flavors of the wine—whether fruity, mineral, etc—which is the good stuff! We aimed to create a wine that is fresh and balanced allowing flavors and aromas like red currants and thyme come through!

People are looking for less of the familiar blush rosés which range from medium to sweet and instead are in search of rosés with more structure and complexity

    • Our new Très Chic rosé provides exuberant flavors of berries, citrus, tropical fruit with a hint of herbs and rose petal. It’s delicate with a balanced acidity.
  • Unsure what to order? Dry = not sweet. And that’s what you want: a wine that’s fresh and acidic, without extra sugar to bury its mineral/fruity/whatever flavors and aromas. Remember, it was super-sweet white zinfandel and its mass-produced brethren that gave rosé a bad name to begin with.